Entry Requirements

What criteria will be used for judging?


A distinguished panel of judges scores candidates in the following areas of competition:

  • Personal Interview – to determine personality, intellect and qualifications to hold national title
  • Swimsuit – to determine physical condition and form
  • Evening Gown – to determine elegance, poise, beauty and grace

You’ll need: an evening gown, swimsuit, interview outfit and heritage dress.

There is NO talent competition and NO minimum height requirements. Weight must be proportional to height.




Requirements for At-Large Nationals Participation


  • Be between the age of 19 and 27 years of age (May not turn 28 in the year of participation.)
  • Be of Latin American or Iberian origin by birth or ancestry and residing in the United States;
  • Reside continuously in the US for a minimum of six months prior to May 1, 2021;
  • Be single, never been married nor given birth to a child;
  • Have an attractive appearance and personality, with weight proportional to height, and a respectable reputation;
  • Be able to travel abroad if chosen national winner and have or be able to obtain the necessary documents for traveling outside of the US to compete in the international finals in Latin America.




Are there State Preliminaries to qualify for the National Competition?


Yes. If there is a state preliminary pageant for which the entrant qualifies, her entry form will be forwarded to that state's director for reply. All other entrants will be considered for "appointed titles" to participate directly as an "at-large" delegate in the National Pageant.

All delegates will be judged equally, regardless of title representation or status as a preliminary winner or at-large delegate. Entrants may apply directly to the National Pageant Office as an “at-large” delegate under the following conditions:

  • No preliminary pageant is offered for which entrant qualifies;
  • Entrant participated previously in preliminary pageant (Must be eligible for heritage or other state representation)




Do delegates need to be US citizens to participate in the National competition?


No. The competition is open to anyone residing in the US who meets all the other eligibility requirements for participation.




Can someone born in another country and living in the US represent that country in the Miss Latin America® of the World Pageant?


No. Delegates to the MISS LATIN AMERICA OF THE WORLD Pageant must participate in the competition of their respective countries of residence to win that representation. However, “heritage” representation is available in the Miss/Teen U.S. LATINA competitions for those living in the US that want to represent their birthplace or that of their parents/ancestors.





Competition Details

State Representation


Eligibility for state titles is determined by meeting at least one of the following criteria, along with all other minimum eligibility requirements for pageant participants:

  • Current residency in the state of representation
  • Current student/work status in the state of representation
  • Born in the state of representation




Heritage Representation


Entrants may also qualify to represent the Latin American or Iberian country of their heritage. The participation of “heritage” delegates in the MISS U.S. LATINA Pageant began in 2003 to highlight the diversity of nationalities that comprise the vast Latino population residing in the USA.

Eligibility for national heritage titles is determined by meeting at least one of the following criteria, along with all other minimum eligibility requirements for pageant participants:

  • Born in the country of representation
  • Have a parent/ancestor born in the country of representation




Official Language


English and Spanish are the official languages of the Miss U.S. Latina Pageant. It is NOT a requirement for contestants to speak Spanish, although it is encouraged. Interviews with judges will be conducted in the language the contestant feels most comfortable speaking.




What prizes do the winners receive?


Each title winner is awarded cash and prizes from the pageant and its sponsors.




Final Registration Deadline: March 30, 2021


YOU could be a titleholder and on your way to becoming the next MISS U.S. LATINA!





Miss Entry Requirements

This could be a life changing experience!
Entry Requirements

 

Requirements for At-Large Nationals Participation

  • Be minimum age 19 by May 1st and maximum age 27 on December 31st in the year of participation;

  • Be of Latin American or Iberian origin by birth or ancestry and residing in the United States;

  • Reside continuously in the US for a minimum of six months prior to May 1st in the year of participation;

  • Be single, never been married nor given birth to a child;

  • Have an attractive appearance and personality, with weight proportional to height, and a respectable reputation;

  • Be able to travel abroad if chosen national winner and have or be able to obtain the necessary documents for traveling outside of the US to compete in the world finals in Latin America.

About the Competition

Competition Details

State Representation Qualifications


Eligibility for state titles is determined by meeting at least one of the following criteria, along with all other minimum eligibility requirements for pageant participants:

  • Current residency in the state of representation
  • Current student/work status in the state of representation
  • Born in the state of representation




Heritage Representation Qualifications


Entrants may also qualify to represent the Latin American or Iberian country of their heritage. The participation of “heritage” delegates in the MISS U.S. LATINA Pageant began in 2003 to highlight the diversity of nationalities that comprise the vast Latino population residing in the USA.

Eligibility for national heritage titles is determined by meeting at least one of the following criteria, along with all other minimum eligibility requirements for pageant participants:

  • Born in the country of representation
  • Have a parent/ancestor born in the country of representation




Official Language


English and Spanish are the official languages of the Miss U.S. Latina Pageant. It is NOT a requirement for contestants to speak Spanish, although it is encouraged. Interviews with judges will be conducted in the language the candidate feels most comfortable speaking.




What You Can Expect


A distinguished panel of judges scores candidates in the following areas of competition:

  • Personal Interview – to determine personality, intellect and qualifications to hold national title
  • Swimsuit – to determine physical condition and form
  • Evening Gown – to determine elegance, poise, beauty and grace

You’ll need: an evening gown, swimsuit, interview outfit and heritage dress.

There is NO talent competition and NO minimum height requirements. Weight must be proportional to height.





FAQs

Can someone born in another country and living in the US represent that country in the Miss Latin America® of the World Pageant?


No. Delegates to the MISS LATIN AMERICA OF THE WORLD Pageant must participate in the competition of their respective countries of residence to win that representation.

However, “heritage” representation is available in the Miss/Teen U.S. LATINA Pageants for those that qualify to represent their Latin American or Iberian country of birth or that of their parents/ancestors.




Do delegates need to be US citizens to participate in the National competition?


No. The competition is open to anyone residing in the US who meets all the other eligibility requirements for participation.




How old are the pageants?


The MISS LATIN AMERICA® OF THE WORLD and MISS U.S. LATINA® competitions began as concurrent events in 1981 in Miami, Florida. MISS TEEN US LATINA™ made its debut in September 2003.




Are these pageants different from others in the USA for Latinas?


MISS U.S. LATINA® is the first national pageant established for Latinas in the USA, along with encouraging higher education, family values and culture. It is also the official national preliminary to select the US delegate to MISS LATIN AMERICA OF THE WORLD, best known worldwide as "MISS AMERICA LATINA DEL MUNDO”, recognized for its reputable standing in international pageantry and for being the longest-running pageant in the world for Latinas.




What are the pageants about?


The pageants showcase Latin women and their personal and professional pursuits, contributing also to the promotion of Latin culture, tourism and goodwill around the world. It is a multi-tier pageant system, beginning at the local level and advancing to the state level, followed by the national and ultimately leading to the international competition in Latin America.




Who produces these pageants?


Organización Miss America Latina, Inc., a Florida corporation headquartered in Miami, produces the pageants annually and directs a network of affiliates in the USA and worldwide. The Pageant Organization and its President/Founder have received special recognitions from Presidents, Tourism Ministers, Governors, and Mayors, both in the US and abroad, for the worthy objectives they have promoted with their work throughout the years.




Where are these competitions held?


Initially held in Miami, Florida in 1986, both MISS LATIN AMERICA OF THE WORLD and MISS U.S. LATINA began taking place in exotic locations in different Latin American countries each year, among these Mexico, Peru, Dominican Republic, Argentina and Costa Rica, to name a few. During those years, the National Pageant returned to the states a few times and in 2018 finally settled again in the United States.




How do the delegates get to the National Pageant?


Cities and states have preliminary competitions produced by local and state directors. The winners of the local competitions advance to compete in their state's pageant, with state winners advancing to the national finals. A delegate may also enter a state competition without having won a city or local title, and where there are no state preliminaries, she may apply for her state’s representation as an at-large delegate.